Main Article Content

Abstract

As housing demand in India is continuously growing, different government schemes are being implemented to cater to the need of mass housing for the poor and lower income group people. Use of Cost-effective Eco-friendly Construction Technologies (CECT) in housing sector in India has the potential to be the most appropriate in terms of economy and acceptability. The reduced cost of building, enhancement of comfort level and non-compromise on safety would decide choice of CECT, which will also act as a market force and demand for such technologies is expected to grow-up. This paper explored the acceptability and adaptability potential of different CECTs with special emphasis on Rat-trap Bond Wall and Filler Slab Roof, through literature study and technical calculations and tried to evaluate the appropriateness of those.

Keywords

Indian housing scenario Cost-effective Eco-friendly Construction Technology Rat-trap Bond Wall Filler Slab Safety Comfort Acceptability Adaptability

Article Details

Citations
Sengupta, N. (2019). Evaluation of Appropriateness of Rat-trap Bond Wall and Filler Slab Roof in housing sector in India. [email protected] - Preprint Archive, 1(1). https://doi.org/10.36375/prepare_u.a16

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